Author Archives: Mandy

KickStarter Launch Off To An Amazing Start!

Mandy:

I am overwhelmed with gratitude. Thank you guys so much for being so supportive of the new documentary project. Please take a moment to read the first update!

Originally posted on One Liberation Under God:

Screen Shot 2014-08-22 at 7.59.53 AMHi, everyone! After months of contemplation, we finally launched the KickStarter page for the project on Tuesday. It had reached a point where I had to stop worrying about number crunching and statistics, and just actually do it! So far, you guys have exceeded my expectations. In less than three days, we reached half of our first goal of $400!

By now, you probably know how the project will work. But you may be wondering how this fundraising thing works. In order to explain why we set such a low goal, I’ll include an excerpt from the project page:

Nashville is my current city, and northeastern KY is my hometown. Therefore, no extra funds are necessary to cover those interviews. Destinations closest to me will take top priority, so we can make the most out of the time and money we have. So why did we only set a $400 goal? 

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Update: Film Project

Hello, all! This is just a quick update to let you know I have not fallen off the face of the earth. I’ve had a lot going on over the summer, most of which is settling down now. I hope all of you are having a relaxing and adventurous summer!

This map shows the proposed route of interviews for the project.

This map shows the proposed route of interviews for the project.

I’m so excited about the documentary project I mentioned earlier this year. (Yes, it is still happening!) I have not begun a Kickstarter campaign yet, because I want to make sure I’m doing this fundraiser thing right. I’ve spoken with a few people… all of whom have very different opinions about how to approach marketing and fundraising for this project. Some say an extended fundraising campaign will do the trick; others say a brief and focused campaign will be more effective. Honestly, I’m not sure what to do (although I’m pretty sure that doing nothing won’t get me too far)! That’s why I’m asking for your thoughts. If you have any ideas for the “One Liberation” film project, please let me know. I do have a short list of organizations and online communities that are willing to advertise once the fundraising begins, although I’m always on the lookout for more!

Stay tuned for more info! In the meantime, I’ll be working on a “real” blog post.

Cheers!

So You’re Gay. Why Can’t You Just Shut Up About It?

713307_82954404This was said to me by a former colleague of mine, albeit slightly more politically correct. I think she said something like: “Why do we have to talk about this? Why can’t you just be quiet?” This came at a crucial time in my life; I was at a crossroads. I could either stay in a ministry which did not accept any aspect of my orientation, or I could resign. I could lie, or I could be true to myself. Put that way, the choice seems easy. I should be a hero, right? Live honestly. Sacrifice comfort for truth. But I enjoyed what I did. I loved the ministry. I loved serving in that capacity. So, I learned to compromise. I told half-truths. I lived a double-life. For a time, I shut up about it.

I’m sure I don’t have to tell you the decision to do so was not in my best interest. It could only last so long: Censoring my personal life; editing pronouns; serving people who I knew would not approve of me (or perhaps not even like me at all) if they knew the truth. For those of us in the LGBT community, these stories are all too familiar. But what saddens me most about situations such as these is not the fact that folks may disagree on LGBT issues, but the fact there is an overall unwillingness for such discussions.

Growing up in a religiously conservative environment, I can recall the fear that surrounded topics such as LGBT issues. It can be an uncomfortable conversation for some folks… and it’s easy to forget that fact once we’ve spent our fair share of time in more progressive circles. But there are a few things I would like to get out into the open. For those folks who wonder why we can’t just shut up about it? Our answer may be a little different than you think.

Most of the LGBT folks I know aren’t interested in running through the streets wearing nothing but a rainbow flag. They don’t want to shout their orientation from the rooftops. They don’t set out to “flaunt” affection in order to make you uncomfortable. They don’t desire to make waves, start arguments, or become poster children for controversy.

Personally, what I want is pretty simple. I want to live in community and fellowship with my brothers and sisters. I want LGBT Christians to be valued for their talents and gifts. I want to serve—to live a life of love and compassion. Most of us long for the day when sexual orientation and gender identity are no longer factors for determining human worth in our religious institutions.

One thing we’ve learned from history: issues don’t disappear when we stop talking about them. And one thing we’ve learned from statistics? Someone you know is LGBT. Yes, even someone in your congregation; and in many cases, it is someone in a leadership role. Instead of pretending people are someone they aren’t, why not seek safe spaces for conversation? Why not tear down those invisible barriers that keep us from true fellowship? It won’t always be easy. It won’t always be pretty. But it is the right thing, plain and simple. Because right now, the message that millions of LGBT Christians are hearing is: “You can continue to serve and use your talents as long as you hide who you are.”

Surely, there has to be a better answer. And that is why I, for one, can no longer shut up about it.

The Mission

Mandy:

Here’s a little more elaboration on the upcoming documentary project!

Originally posted on One Liberation Under God:

Hey everyone! I just wanted to take a second and elaborate on the vision for this project. Here are a few key points:

1. This project is about communication, not debate! This is the single most important point to make. The idea is to gain understanding, and consider points of view with which we don’t agree.

2. The goal is to give equal voice to all points of view. If you’ve seen the promo video, you may be wondering where the straight people are! I included photos of the participants who sent them to me. There are a few other folks who fall on the more conservative side of the scale, and they will be included in the film; they just weren’t included in the video. That being said, I would like to schedule more interviews with more conservatively-minded people, as right now only 15% of our interviewees fit that criteria.

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Promo Video Launched!

Mandy:

FYI: Here’s a link to the official website and promo video for the documentary project.

Originally posted on One Liberation Under God:

After several long weeks, I’ve finally been able to finish the promo video. Now, the real work begins! While I’m itching to get started, I realize the fundraising process can be a delicate thing, and I want to do it right! Stay tuned for the fundraising launch, which should be happening in a couple of weeks. In the meantime, send prayers, love, and good vibes this way. Here’s hoping to a successful project that will hopefully help us all to find some common ground.

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Documentary Promo Video Launched!

After several long weeks, I’ve finally been able to finish the promo video. Now, the real work begins! While I’m itching to get started, I realize the fund-raising process can be a delicate thing, and I want to do it right! Stay tuned for the fund-raising launch, which should be happening in a couple of weeks. In the meantime, send prayers, love, and good vibes this way. Here’s hoping to a successful project that will hopefully help us all to find some common ground.

Check out the project’s website, which will be finished within the week.

Is Social Networking a Viable Platform for Advocacy?

Hello, all! I hope you’re doing splendid. I’ve got a short post today…just something I’ve been pondering a lot lately. And really, it all comes down to one question: How do you use social networking? We’ve covered this topic briefly in a recent podcast episode. Quite honestly, I’ve been struggling with it on a personal level for quite some time.

Facebook is intended to be a pleasant experience. We know that’s not always true. People still manage to grate on our nerves from time to time, whether it’s face-to-face, or via the screens we now use on a daily basis. Most of the time, decent human beings can find a way to coexist peacefully, both on and offline. But when it comes to LGBT advocacy, it can be a touchy subject. If you’re like me, you post about things because you’re passionate about it. You’re happy to discuss it, and you may even hope someone approaches you about your point of view. But you never post something with the purpose of ruffling someone else’s feathers. But sometimes, people interpret your good intentions into bad ones. (You may be able to tell by now, this has happened to me in the past.)

I have many faults. One of them is—and has always been—caring way too much about what people think of me. Once someone becomes truly offended by something I’ve said, my mind goes into analytical mode. I spend the next several days (and sometimes weeks), wondering what I could have done differently. Then, I begin to imagine the worst: that they have grown to dislike me on a fundamental level. What if they’re telling everyone they know that I’m a terrible person? What if they’re shaking their heads, wondering what’s happened to me?

Before you say it, I know: If people really are going to be that way, I don’t need them in my life. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, and if they can’t listen to mine, then I’m better off without them. But I just don’t work that way. I want to have peaceful, loving relationships with everyone I know. I don’t want drama; I just want to speak out about the things that matter to me.

But I’m beginning to wonder: Should I leave the advocacy to the straight allies? Are LGBT rights simply too close to home for me? Do I take things personally when I otherwise wouldn’t? I’m torn: part of me thinks I should press on… use Facebook as a means for expression on the issues that are dear to my heart. The other part of me thinks I would save myself a lot of unnecessary stress if I could limit my Facebook activity to check-ins and photos of my cute little fur babies.

How do you handle social networking? Is Facebook a place for advocacy? Leave your thoughts in the comment section.